Teamviewer Quicksupport Fraud, How to Protect Yourself From Teamviewer Quicksupport Fraud.

 

The Teamviewer Quicksupport scam is a new form of cybercrime that preys on unsuspecting victims. The scam starts when you get an unsolicited call from someone claiming to be from Teamviewer, Microsoft, or even your ISP. The caller offers to fix your computer remotely, but instead installs malware and holds your computer hostage. They may also try to steal personal information like banking details and passwords. These types of scams are not new, but they are becoming more sophisticated in their tactics. This blog post will teach you how to spot the signs of a legitimate tech support call versus a fraudulent one.

The scammers often use phone numbers with area codes in the U.S., Canada, Australia, etc., but they can also use international numbers for added credibility. They may also spoof their caller ID so it displays the number of well-known companies so you think it’s real. If you get any unwanted calls from someone claiming to provide tech support services, these.


What is Teamviewer Quicksupport Fraud?

This scam is a new form of cybercrime that preys on unsuspecting victims. The scam is executed when you get an unsolicited call from someone claiming to be from Teamviewer, Microsoft, or even your ISP. The caller offers to fix your computer remotely, but instead installs malware and holds your computer hostage. They may also try to steal personal information like banking details and passwords. These types of scams are not new, but they are becoming more sophisticated in their tactics.

The scammers often use phone numbers with area codes in the U.S., Canada, Australia, etc., but they can also use international numbers for added credibility. They may also spoof their caller ID so it displays the number of well-known companies so you think it’s real. If you get any unwanted calls from someone claiming to provide tech support services, these are some signs that this could be a scam:


How the scam works

The scam starts by getting you to call them back. You may be prompted to call a number or they may call you. Some scammers will even send spam emails that contain malware, which then calls your phone when you open it.

Once you are on the call, the scammer will ask for access to your computer. They may claim they are from Microsoft or Adobe, and say they need access to update your software. Often times, they can hack into your computer remotely without any additional information or security checks.

They will then install malicious software on your computer, which gives them full control of your system and all its data. They can take screenshots of your personal information, banking details, passwords, etc., and hold the computer hostage until you pay a ransom fee for their service


How to spot a fraudulent call

What are some ways to spot a fraudulent call?

- They pressure you into giving them remote access to your computer.

- They ask for credit card info, bank account numbers, or other personal information.

- They threaten you with legal action or use scare tactics to intimidate you.

The best rule of thumb is if the caller wants anything from you, it’s probably not legitimate. If someone is trying to fix your computer remotely, they should be asking you questions about your computer and what’s wrong with it before they try to connect. If someone is claiming that they are “Microsoft” or another well-known company but they call you directly instead of emailing, it may not be legitimate. Also, if someone threatens you or uses scare tactics when talking to you, it might not be legitimate.



What to do if you believe you’ve been scammed

The Teamviewer team is aware of these scams, but it can be difficult to determine if someone is a legitimate call or not. If you think you’ve been scammed, contact one of the official Teamviewer phone numbers found in the Support section of their website.

If you try to contact them via email or social media, they may refer you back to their phone number. If they’re not on the company’s approved list, then they are likely not an authorized representative.


Conclusion

If you believe you’ve been targeted by Teamviewer Quicksupport Fraud, please share your story with us.

Share this article with your friends to help spread the word about this scam.

Teamviewer will continue to share information about Teamviewer Quicksupport Fraud on our blog and social media channels to help protect people from this scam.

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